Église Saint-Wilfrid de Kingscroft

(Church of St. Wilfrid of Kingscroft)

3035 Chemin Kingscroft

A bit of history

The Church of St. Wilfrid of Kingscroft owes its name to father Wilfrid Lussier, parish priest of Saint-Edmond de Coaticook, who celebrated the first religious services in Kingscroft around 1870.



The canonical erection of the parish of Saint-Wilfrid-de-Barnston so called at the time, took place in 1903. It was not until the following year before the first resident priest, Father Joseph-Albert Gervais, came to settle there. That same year, the authorities built the Church and the Presbytery.  In 1910 a fire ravaged the Church; however, the Rectory remained intact.  The religious temple was again functional in 1912.  The authorities carried out external renovations in 1920, and interior repairs in 1929.  

In the years 1920-1930, the basement of the Church was trendy.  It served as a Community Centre for the residents of the hamlet.  It produced plays and shows. Even today, the Kingscroft community meets there for special events.

In 1974-1975, the Bishop of Sherbrooke decided to close the parish of St. Wilfrid of Kingscroft.  The parishioners mobilized and their determination allowed to keep the Church open by becoming a service to the parish of Saint-Luc in Barnston in the late 1970s, and that of the Holy Apostles in the 2000s.

The Church, dating from the early 1910s is clad with white clapboard planks in decay and with Canadian sheet metal roofing. The framing rests on twelve steel beams covered with wood, and the Bell Tower is 15 meters high. It features rectangular and curved wooden windows, the oculus, wooden doors and jambs; and the inner lining is painted jute.

At the Saint-Wilfrid of Kingscroft Centennial Celebration, 1904-2004, the Municipality of Barnston-Ouest offered a commemorative plaque, which they erected on the premises. At the end of 2018, the Catholic authorities agreed to close the building, and they celebrated the last Mass on January 27, 2019.



Building information

  • The Church, dating from the early 1910s is clad with white clapboard planks in decay and with Canadian sheet metal roofing.
  • The framing rests on twelve steel beams covered with wood.
  • The Bell Tower is 15 meters high.
  • It features rectangular and curved wooden windows, the oculus, wooden doors and jambs.
  • The inner lining is painted jute.